Bracelet

ca. 1860 (made)

Firm of John Brogden

Height: 4.2 cm, Width: 6.6 cm, Depth: 6.6 cm, Height: 3 cm seal

735-1890 MET

Gold bracelet with applied decoration representing Ashurbanipal, King of Assyria, after a relief in the British Museum, by John Brogden, England, about 1860

Gold bracelet with applied decoration representing Ashurbanipal (668-627 BC), King of Assyria, sacrificing on his return from a lion hunt, after a relief in the British Museum. On the clasp, a Babylonian cylinder in steatite. Maker's mark of John Brogden.

The archaeological excavations of the 19th century provided new inspiration for jewellers. This bracelet shows a scene of the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal sacrificing on his return from a lion hunt. This subject is taken from a relief that was excavated by Sir A.H. Layard and displayed in the British Museum. Intellectuals particularly admired archaeological-style jewellery from around 1860 until at least the 1880s.

Applied decoration representing Ashurbanipal (668-627 BC), King of Assyria, sacrificing on his return from a lion hunt, after a relief in the British Museum. On the clasp, a Babylonian cylinder in steatite. The Assyrian sculptures in the British Museum excavated by Sir A.H. Layard were a source of inspiration to many designers. Layard published Nineveh and its Remains (1848-9) and Nineveh and Babylon (1853).

Bequeathed by Mrs Harriet Bolckow

Location: Jewellery, room 91, case 54, shelf B, box 3

View this object on the V&A website