Bust

Christ

1865 (made)

Holme Cardwell

Height: 62 cm excluding plinth

416:1, 2-1906 SCP

Bust, marble, of Christ, by Holme Cardwell, after the original by Bertel Thorvaldsen, Rome, 1865

Bust of Christ on pedestal. Head slightly bent forward.

Cardwell made this bust when in Rome in 1865. It is a reduced copy of the original full-length figure of Christ produced by Bertel Thorvaldsen in 1821 for the Church of Our Lady, Copenhagen, now Copenhagen Cathedral. Accompanying figures of the Twelve Apostles were produced by Thorvaldsen between 1821-1842, which together with the Christ were displayed in the interior of the Church. The figure of Christ, which is regarded as one of the best-known and most affecting religious images of the 19th century, was widely copied and imitated. Holme Cardwell (1820-1864) attended the Royal Academy Schools in 1834, and in 1841 travelled to Paris where he studied under David d'Angers (1788-1856). Cardwell later settled in Rome. He exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1837 and 1856, at the British Institution in 1840, and twice at the Suffolk Street Galleries.

The pedestal of the bust is said to have formed part of a column from the Forum of Trajan in Rome. According to the donor this bust was executed by Cardwell when in Rome in 1865. It is a reduced copy of the original full-length figure of Christ produced by Bertel Thorvaldsen during 1821 for the Church of our Lady, Copenhagen, now Copenhagen Cathedral. Accompanying figures of the Twelve Apostles were produced by Thorvaldsen between 1821-1842, which together with the Christ were displayed in the interior of the Church. The figure on Christ which is regarded as one of the best-known and most affecting religious images of the 19th century, was widely copied and imitated. Given by Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence, Bart., King's Ride, Ascot, Berkshire in 1906. On loan to the Bethnal Green Museum from the Department of Architecture and Sculpture from 1928. Returned to the Sculpture Department in 1982.

Location: In Storage

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