Statuette

America

1760-1763 (made)

Vauxhall porcelain factory

Height: 33.5 cm, Width: 16 cm, Depth: 13 cm

414:8-1885 CER

Figure, in soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels and gilded, of a Red Indian woman representing America, made by Vauxhall porcelain factory, Vauxhall, 1760-1763.

Figure, in soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels and gilded, of a Red Indian woman representing America, standing and wearing flowered and gilded drapery and a head-dress of feathers, and she is taking an arrow with her right hand from a quiver on her back, and in her left hand she holds a bow, and she is supported by the stump of a flowering tree, at the base of which is a prairie-dog, on a round rococo scrolled base.

Object Type This figure, emblematic of America, is a purely decorative piece from a set representing the Four Continents. Each of the figures is frontally posed, and the backs are poorly finished, so they were probably intended to be seen against a wall. They may have been displayed set out on a chimneypiece or other domestic furnishing. This figure has previously been attributed to both the Bow and the Longton Hall porcelain factories. People The Vauxhall porcelain factory was run by Nicholas Crisp (born about 1704; died 1774), a merchant and owner of a jewellery shop in the City of London, in partnership with John Saunders, a delftware potter. Crisp was also a founder and very active member of the Society of Arts. The modeller of these pieces has not been identified. However, the Neo-classical sculptor John Bacon (1740-1799) was apprenticed to Crisp and is said to have modelled for the factory. On the other hand, it is known that the Vauxhall factory employed a modeller and mould-maker named Hammersley, who later worked at Plymouth, where these figures of the Continents were also manufactured.

America, as one of a set of Four Continents, is inspired by the antique Greek statue of Artemis, known as 'Diane Chasseresse', in the Louvre Museum, Paris.

Given by Lady Charlotte Schreiber

Location: British Galleries, room 53a, case 1

View this object on the V&A website